May 1931 PDF Print
Thursday, 12 May 2011 08:33

MAY 7, 1931

AD.  Here’s the Straws For You!  Crawford-Gatlin starts the Straw Hat Season off with the greatest values ever offered.  These are real excellent hats.  The Sailors are correctly designed – and the Panamas are the excepted [NOTE TO HENRY– I think this should have been “accepted.”] shapes, showing both large and small brims.  All Head Sizes.  Crawford-Gatlin, Inc.
----------
The new brick church at Mt. Olivet, near Austin, will be dedicated on 5th  Sunday and, on the same day, the annual dedication services will be held, both before and after noon.  Dinner will be served “on the ground.”
----------
Mr. Floyd Forrest, of  Lecta, member of the 123rd Cavalry outfit, has been awarded a diploma from the National Radio Institute at Washington and is now a full-fledged Radio-Trician.  In his examination, young Forrest made 100% average, --which is so far ahead of the average scholar that he is really in a place by himself.
----------
AD.  Drop In At Noon and Sample That 40-cent Lunch for Business People.
Choice Meats, Fresh Vegetables, Appetizing Salads.  HOTEL SPOTSWOOD.
We cater to ladies.
----------
Beginning May 2 the Hotel Owens at Horse Cave will have a dance from 9:00 until 12:00 each Saturday night.  The management has been recently acquired by Mr. Bob Graham of Bowling Green.  Music will be furnished by Jewell Bybee and his Night Owls, who have frequently furnished music in this section.  Mr. Graham extends an invitation to all the young people of Glasgow to attend.
----------

MAY 14, 1931

Mrs. Minnie Hood Sartin, of 88, was killed by lightning during an electric and hail storm on Tuesday, May 12.  She was out in the open field, driving the cow up for milking, no trees or other things to draw lightning, when she was struck.  Her son, Sam Sartin, her only child, happened to see her at the moment.  Of course, death was instantaneous.  She was wearing spectacles,  and these were thrown about five feet, the frames burned in two, but the glasses not broken.  Funeral services were held in the Beech Grove Church and burial followed in the Summer Shade Cemetery.
----------

MAY 14, 1931 (Cont’d)

Among the rural students of Barren County who have taken the 8th grade exam and are now eligible for High School are Hazel Burgess, Elizabeth Button, Beatrice Landrum, Rebecca Lowery, Avis Rhoton, Mallie Turner, and Frances Smith.  Mallie Turner and Rebecca Lowery made the highest grades, having made 94% and 92% respectively.
This is a great showing for rural schools of Barren County and speaks well for our Superintendent, Mr. W. M. Totty, and for our rural teachers.
---------
At the regular meeting of the Monroe County Board of Education, Paul Lyon was reappointed County Superintendent for a four-year term.  Notwithstanding his youth, as he has the distinction of being the youngest Superintendent in the state, he had made such a splendid record during his past year in office that he was given the full limit of the law – a four-year term.
----------
Air Mail One of Possibilities for City.  It is of relative importance for us to again look forward to the development of our airport.  Daily the American Airways traversing from Cincinnati to Nashville and vice versa pass over our community carrying both   mail and passengers.  We are a thriving city with substantial commercial activities and growing daily in population; therefore, it is well that we look ahead into the future and prepare for the more rapid means of transportation, both personnel and commodity.
----------
Hospital Day Observed.  The Community Hospital held open house for visitors on Hospital Day, May 12.  A large number of visitors and friends made a tour of the institute which was beautifully decorated with flowers and plants donated by Mrs. Richardson’s Florists and the Junior Women’s Club.  A violin quartet rendered Old English songs, which were very much enjoyed.  Babies presented with their birth certificates were JoAnn Gillenwater, Mary Jo Ridley, Betty Oliver, Sarah Alice Downey, and Joseph Mark Dougherty.
----------

MAY 21, 1931
Miss Eldora Harlow was winner of the $5.00 prize offered by the D.A.R. for writing the best essay on the History of the Constitution.  Each paper was numbered and then all were graded by a committee, not knowing whose paper they had decided on until it was returned to the teacher of the Social Science Department and the name was matched to correspond with the number.
----------

From Summer Shade:  Professor A.C. Loudermilk, of Bowling Green, was speaker
at the Commencement Service held last Thursday night.  There were five graduates:  Misses Elsie Isenberg, Nellie Sartin, Beatrice Nunnally, Ollie Perkins, and Mr. Oral Williams.
----------
Aged Veteran Dies in Hart County.  Buford Pemberton Moss, 86, died at his home at Canmer, Hart County, on Tuesday, May 19, following a paralytic stroke last Saturday.  Mr. Moss was a veteran of the War between the States.  Surviving him are a daughter, Mrs. Emma Stewart, Louisville, and four sons:  John Moss, Hardyville, Will Moss and Henry Moss, of Jeffersonville, Indiana; and Claud Moss of Canmer; and two sisters.
---------
4000 Acres of Hamilton Estate Sold.  The estate of the late Mr. J. A. Hamilton, Sr. was sold at auction Tuesday and brought a little more than $50,000, being a fraction more than $12.50 per acre.  This included some of the finest land in Metcalfe County, noted for its fine productive land.  Purchasers were the five heirs of the estate.
---------
Mr. J. B. Hiser has leased his filling station down on the Jackson Highway, formerly the Fisher Station, to Mr. Leo Greer, who is now operating it.  Mr. Hiser is preparing to build a house adjoining the lot on which the station is located.
----------

MAY 28, 1931
Lt. Sam Sears was ordered to active duty in the Harlan Coal fields last week, and on Friday he, his wife, and Mrs. A. E. Ely went to Harlan, where they found our National Guard boys all well and strictly on duty.  The two ladies returned home Sunday afternoon and were very complimentary of the services the soldiers are rendering.  Mrs. Ely thinks that the “uniform” is respected and she does not believe there will be an outbreak while the soldiers are on duty.  She also believes their presence there is absolutely necessary.
----------
Golf Course for Glasgow.  A number of the liveliest citizens of Glasgow have organized a golf club and are now engaged in getting up subscriptions enough to ensure a first-class club.  Part of Mr. Harry Norris’s land is to be used as the field, and it is expected that very soon an important announcement will appear in the newspaper.
----------

Rapid Strides Being Made on Bowling Green Highway.  Mr. F. C. Underwood has informed us that considerable headway is being made on the grade and drain contract of the highway from the Warren County line to Glasgow.  Work has reached Bon Ayr, and the contractors feel certain of completing the work to the Glasgow city limit no later than September 1.  The work of constructing the bridge across Beaver Creek on this highway is also under way.
----------
Mr. W. T. Poteet and family, of Lexington, are to be here the last of the week to visit Mrs. Poteet’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Jones, and to attend decoration services at Poplar Log.-----Mr. Edwin Barlow, student at University of Alabama, arrived home last Friday for a visit with his mother, Mrs. Jennie P. Barlow, until sometime in July, when he intends to enter the University of Wisconsin.
----------
Family Has Narrow Escape from Injuries.  Mr. Curtis Harvey and family narrowly missed a serious, if not fatal, accident one morning last week as they were en route to Louisville.  They were about ten miles beyond Elizabethtown when the rear axle of his car broke on the right side, letting the housing strike the road.  It required all of Mr. Harvey’s strength to keep the car from leaving the road.  A motorist who was meeting the car saw the wheel jump across the highway, across a ditch and a wire fence, and run 30’ or 40’ into a field, but he could not explain how the wheel performed such a seemingly almost impossible feat.
----------
From Forkton:  The Red Cross Relief work has come and gone, leaving in its wake much needed help.  The awful drought last year left in our mouths a bad taste and vivid memory of its far reaching effects.  It was the worst ever experienced within the memory of the oldest inhabitants, but with good crops this year, it will finally pass away like everything else.
----------
From Huffman: Mr. and Mrs. Herschel Wells and Miss Audrey Harvey spent Sunday at Mr. George Harlan’s.-----Mrs. Gladys Witty and little daughter, Violet, and Mrs. Mary Wells were visiting at Mr. Kesslar Hurt’s one afternoon recently.
----------

 

 

WCLU Weather

65°
18°
°F | °C
Fair
Humidity: 74%
Wed
Clear
58 | 84
14 | 28
Thu
Mostly Sunny
67 | 88
19 | 31