November 1930 PDF Print
Wednesday, 17 November 2010 07:48


NOVEMBER  6, 1930

Oil Down Again.  Our report of the oil situation in the new LeGrande field is a good one so far as production is concerned, but the price has taken another tumble of 25 cents per gallon, down to 85 cents.  Ten days ago, the price was $1.35 per barrel, then dropped to $1.10 and now, within a week of the first drop, has fallen to 85 cents.  Some tumble. The same old adage.  As in farming, and all other industries, supply and demand control the price.
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Three Young Men Figure in Serious Auto Smash.  Ollie James Wooten, son of Policeman Eugene Wooten, sustained painful injuries Sunday afternoon when his Ford “skeeter” turned over on the North Jackson Highway.  His companions, Rondal Winegar and Marion Gassoway, received minor injuries.  According to one of the occupants, the “skeeter” was traveling at a rapid gait when the accident occurred.  Ollie James had just traded for the “skeeter” and, having no speedometer and not being acquainted with the car, under-rated his speed.
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“On the Square” for Square Meals.  Mr. Dee Holmes has purchased the restaurant formerly owned by Robert Morgan just below Spotswood Hotel, and the teamwork of “Dee and Tish” that has made his restaurant popular at other stands is again in harness, serving the people with home cooking and prompt service.  You know them. Their location is the only thing to consider.
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Small Fire in Church.  Tuesday afternoon the fire alarm brought the fire department and a host of others to the Christian Church, where a small fire in the little room behind the pastor’s study was found and easily extinguished.  Some young folks were preparing for a party that night and had a fire in a little gas stove.  It seems a curtain “flopped” against the stove, starting the fire.  The loss was fully covered by insurance.
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From Willow Shade.  Mr. and Mrs. Z. N. Kesslar and children were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Johnnie Kesslar Sunday.-----Mr. T. H. Ballard underwent an operation for appendicitis at the Community Hospital Saturday.-----Miss Lillian Garmon spent the week end with her sister, Mrs. J. W. Smith, of Marrowbone.
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NOVEMBER 13, 1930

From Elbow Springs.  Misses Gladys Ward, Frances Maggard, Elizabeth Depp and Mary Frances Depp, who are attending school at Scottsville, spent last week end at their homes here.-----The kitchen shower, charivari and party given for Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Bellamy Saturday night at the home of Mr. T. V. Rigsby, was enjoyed by a large crowd.  Several nice presents were received.
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Honor Roll of Poplar Spring School.  Edith Bishop, Wallace Dean, Nelson Matthews, Arnold Mansfield, Christine Harvey, Emmett Matthews, Paul Jackson, Imo Lynn, Louvern Mansfield, Harold Matthews, Imogene Bishop, Marvin Shipley, Mildred Thomas, Katie Maud Matthews.  LEE DENHAM, TEACHER.
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From Arnett Grove.  Mr. John Shirley went to Albany last Friday and bought a bunch of cattle and on his way home Friday night turned his car over and broke three ribs besides receiving other bruises.  He has been with his sister, Mrs. Etta Beebe, at Glasgow since his accident.  The car was completely demolished.-----
Some thief entered the barn of Mr. Sam Gooden Sunday night and stole two tires and rims and his spare tire off his car.
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The 123rd Cavalry Troop had its first call to actual service Monday afternoon when a call came to report to Columbia as soon as possible.  It seems that a man named Bill Newton Smith had killed his wife a short time earlier and when the evidence came up in Circuit Court, it was that the murder was of a most brutal nature, and when the prosecution lawyer pleaded for the death penalty, the audience cheered and groups of citizens began expressing themselves that Smith should be hanged.  There was an open threat that if the verdict was not for the death penalty, the mob would take matters into their own hands.  Judge J. C.  Carter of Tompkinsville, the presiding judge, called Governor Sampson, who ordered the National Guard to guard the prisoner overnight.  Capt. Ely proceeded at once, by motor, for Columbia with 25 soldiers, reaching there in a little more three hours.  The soldier boys were quartered overnight in the court house, only a few doors away from the jail, and the next day Smith was sentenced to life in the penitentiary.  Capt. Ely and four of the guardsmen, along with the Sheriff and Jailer, accompanied the prisoner as far as Lebanon, when it was decided that the Sheriff and Jailer would be sufficient the remainder of the way to Frankfort; and so the soldiers all arrived home late Tuesday afternoon.
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NOVEMBER 13, 1930

AD. Figures Don’t Lie!  Glasgow Led the Burley Tobacco Market of Kentucky Season of 1929-1930.  By a wide margin, Glasgow led a competitive market of more than 125 miles distance that is seeking business in this vicinity.  Taking into consideration the facts that the drayage cost amounts to at least a dollar a hundred, that two sets of buyers will be on the local floors, that the local average has always been high and that the local warehouse facilities equal those anywhere, there are scanty reasons to market elsewhere.  It means money to you – money to your neighbor and money to your county to market your tobacco in Glasgow.  Our long established and reliable houses are ready to serve you.
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NOVEMBER 20, 1930

Governor Sampson Grants His First Pardon.  Governor Flem D. Sampson has held the office of Governor for almost three years without granting a pardon; however, he has always said he believes in issuing pardons where they are deserved.  Of course the Democratic press has poked fun at him, claiming he was just trying to make a “record.”  Now that he has issued a pardon, he is forced to break his bid for popularity, so they say.  The lucky man was Mr. Selvie Hodge of Bullitt County, who was given a life sentence as a member of a mob in 1927.  It was later shown that he was innocent of the crime of which he was accused.
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Done Catching Chickens.  Mr. J. S. Pursley, route 4, was exhibiting three grey foxes on the street here Wednesday, which he had shot that morning.  According to Mr. Pursley, this trio had been feeding on his chickens and he had been diligently watching for the foxes.  Yesterday was the first chance he got at them on his land, and he killed the three without moving out of his tracks.
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Officers Make Big Haul on Buck Creek.  Three men of the Buck Creek area were placed in jail here Tuesday night, charged with violating the local option laws.  While operating two 30-gallon stills in a secluded place on Buck Creek, they were taken into custody by Deputy Sheriffs Will Barlow and Grover Britt, and Deputy Jailer Charlie Jones.  Three companions made their escape.  The raid netted not 
only the three alleged violators, but two 30-gallon stills and 30 gallons of whiskey , and 12 barrels of mash.
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NOVEMBER 20, 1930

Mr. Edward  L. Bagby, 71, died at his home at Hiseville Tuesday afternoon after a lingering illness.  Survivors are  his wife, Mrs. Irene Bagby; one daughter, Mrs. Emma Williams; and three sons, Messrs. Arthur Bagby of Beckton; Roe Bagby of Gary, Indiana; and Elvin Bagby of Hiseville.  He also leaves two sisters, Mrs. Jennie Depp and Mrs. Annie Burris, both of Hiseville; and four brothers, Messrs. W. S. Bagby of Wisdom; Luther Bagby of Houston, Texas; Charley Bagby of Redding, Ohio; and Roddy Bagby of Coral Hill.  Funeral services were conducted in the Christian Church in Hiseville, of which the deceased was a devout member, and the remains were interred in the Hiseville Cemetery.  Mr. Bagby was one of the best citizens of the county and had a large influence for good, which he used to the limit.
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At this particular season, it is appropriate to tell about the woman who, after twenty years of patient effort, succeeded in having an annual Thanksgiving cele- bration in this country observed on the same day by all of the people.  The name of this woman was Mrs. Sara Josepha Hale.  Few women, either before or since, have accomplished more big things for the betterment of men and women.  Mrs. Hale was born at Newport, New Hampshire in 1788 and died in Philadelphia in 1879. Married to David Hale in 1813, she was a widow with five children nine years later. An ambitious lady and a hard worker, she became editor of “Ladies Maga-  zine” which later became the well known “Godey’s Ladies Book.”  For 20 years she wrote editorials in her magazines and personal letters to governors and presidents, in behalf of a national Thanksgiving Day.  Her efforts and patience were rewarded in 1864, when President Abraham Lincoln saw the wisdom of her suggestion, decided to adopt her plan, and declared the fourth Thursday of November as the first Thanksgiving Day to be celebrated by the entire nation.
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NOVEMBER 27, 1930

It Was “Plenty” Sad.  Just five minutes before the city clock struck ten Monday morning, it happened.  Twenty gallons of whiskey taken in a raid on Buck Creek last Thursday night was consigned to the gutter, by order of the court, and went rippling down towards South Fork Creek.  Another keg of ten gallons was kept for evidence.  The ceremonies were witnessed by some twenty-five or more whose countenances bespoke the sadness of the occasion.  That’s just one more thing to be thankful for today, that this twenty gallons of poison was destroyed instead of being dispersed to people who did not need it, and whose families need the price of it for the necessities of life.
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Mr. Lohden Surrenders Cash to Highwaymen.  Two men in an Essex Coach with Illinois license tags held up and robbed Dewey Lohden of about $25.00 at ten o’clock Saturday night.  Mr. Lohden operates a cream station in the old “rock house” on Lower Depot Street and was on his way to his home near Lecta when the robbery took place.  According to Mr. Lohden, the car pulled across the road in front of him, forcing him to stop.  One of the men got out of the car with drawn pistol and forced the victim to hand over his money.
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Mr. Lacey Doyle, who but recently bought the Dee Holmes restaurant on Lower Depot Street, sold out to Mr. Charley Baker, and Mr. Baker took charge Monday morning.  Mr. Baker is a popular restaurant man and his success is assured.  Mr. Doyle says he will join “buzzards’ roost” at the court house for the winter.
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Dee Holmes Buys Another Restaurant.  Mr. Dee Holmes, one of Glasgow’s most popular men, has purchased the restaurant in front of the Overall Factory and has already taken possession.  He promises his customers the same courtesy with  which they have always been served in his eating places.
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The last shovel of asphalt was spread over the last foot of the Jackson Highway yesterday afternoon by Mr. P. W. Holman, President of the Glasgow Chamber of Commerce, and now the road is open from Louisville to Nashville.  Every foot through Barren County from the Hart County line to the Allen County line has been covered with thick asphalt, and the road is open from end to end.
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From Tompkinsville. Mesdames Gladys Carter and children, who live on the Glasgow pike, three miles from town, and Joyce White of South Bend, Indiana, spent last Friday with their sister, Mrs. Buford Page, and Mr. Page. ----- Last Friday Dr. and Mrs. J. A. White attended the dedication and formal opening of the Henry Harlan Bridge on the Austin Peay Memorial Highway at Celina, Tennessee.
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AD. Fine as it is, the new Chevrolet Six now sells at lower prices – making the economy and satisfaction of Chevrolet ownership even more outstanding.  We urge you to come in and see the Bigger and Better Chevrolet.  Its modern design reflects  the spirit of the times – and it represents a value which will command the interest of every buyer in the low-price field.
 The Phaeton   $510
 The Roadster   $475
 Sport Roadster with
       Rumble seat  $495
 The Coach   $545
 Standard Sedan  $635
IT’S WISE TO CHOOSE A SIX!

     RICHARDSON CHEVROLET COMPANY
     CORNER RACE AND WAYNE STREETS
                   GLASGOW, KY
 

 

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