NOVEMBER 1933 PDF Print
Monday, 04 November 2013 18:14

NOVEMBER 2, 1933

Re-Employment Office Registers About  200.  About 200 unemployed persons have been registered by the local re-employment office which opened last Friday in the Circuit Court Room in charge of J.D. Mosby.  Of this number, 23 have been given assignments at Mammoth Cave, where a Civilian Conservation Corps camp is under construction.

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Mare Stolen.  Some sneak thief stole a valuable mare from Mr. Charles E. Smith, who lives about eight miles from town on the Edmonton Road.  We often hear of cars being stolen, but it is unusual to hear of a horse being stolen nowadays – or nights.

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AD.  NOTICE.  We Are Now Open.  For  Business in the Big Spring Bottom.  We will pay the highest market price for poultry and eggs.  We want you to give us a call.  Honest Weight.  The Peter Fox Sons Co., George F. Bandy, Manager.

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From  Burkesville.  Free Ferry Opened.  The Free Ferry operated by the State Highway Commission over the Cumberland River at this place started operations Monday.  This ferry is on State Highway No. 90 which is a part of the Park-to-Park Highway.  On the first night, the following number crossed the Ferry:  13 cars, 2 wagons and 8 footmen.  On the second day, there were 341 passengers, 63 cars, 35 trucks, 13 wagons, 12 horseback riders, and 2 cows.

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NOVEMBER 9, 1933

At Rock Bottom.  16” Air Tight Heaters, $1.25;  20” Air Tight Heaters, $1.75;  24” @ $2.25.     22” Hot Blast Stove with heavy cast door in front, lined with heavy corrugated sheet metal, damper in pipe, apron in front, @ $3.50.   W.D. Dickinson, Glasgow,  Ky.

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Dr. Fidella Edwards is constructing a log hut in rear of his residence in Highland Park which, when completed, will be used to house his large collection of stuffed birds and animals.

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When Mr. Robert Beck went to dig his potatoes a few days ago, he found that someone had dug half his crop.  From the part not molested, he secured somewhat of four bushels, and it is assumed that the thieves also secured that amount.  The report is that Dick Houchens, Dick Nuckols, Jack Brown and Smith Oliver, all  have been visited by these prowlers and have suffered from their visits, having corn and other farm products stolen.

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Proclamation.  As Mayor of the City of Glasgow, I do hereby proclaim that all business houses in the City of Glasgow shall remain closed from 10:30 a.m. until 12 noon on Saturday, November 11, in order that the Armistice Program of the American Legion may be observed by all employees.  J.E. Clayton, Mayor of Glasgow.

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NOVEMBER 16, 1933

Mid-Nite Curfew Invoked.   In an effort to assist  officers in combatting a wave of thievery with which this community has been inflicted for several weeks, Mayor Clayton Tuesday put into effect midnight curfew which applies to all persons encountered on the street after that hour and who, unless they can satisfy the officers as to their identity or business, will be confined in the city jail until the next morning.

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Fatally Wounds Brother in Election Brawl.  Alonzo Yarberry, who, with his brother Ed, was wounded by another brother, Gilford Yarberry, in an election-day brawl near their home at Breeding, Adair County, died at the Community Hospital here last Friday as result of the wounds.  Little information could be obtained by us concerning the tragedy, but we are advised that immediately after the shooting, Gilford put his brothers in a car and brought them to the hospital for treatment.  Alonzo succumbed to his wounds on Friday, but Ed had recovered sufficiently to return to his home Wednesday morning.

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NOVEMBER 23, 1933

Child’s Leg Amputated.   Patrick Key, about five years of age, underwent an operation at the Community Hospital Monday for the amputation of a leg just below the hip, as a result of complications which set up after he had been wounded last week by the accidental discharge of a gun at the hands of a smaller brother.

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Sheriff-elect Roy B. Payne was sworn in last Friday as Deputy Sheriff  under Sheriff Tom Barlow, and expects to devote considerable time between now and January  in learning the routine of his new office which he will assume at that time.

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An Ill Wind in the Lecta Community.  A letter in this issue from Arnett Grove is rather unusual insofar as accidents might be concerned.  It reports four:  Ralph Cox was painfully injured when a mule he was riding fell on him; Edith Bray, tripped by a dog, was thrown to the ground, breaking her arm; Sam Gooden, hauling a load of wood, was thrown from and under his wagon when the wood slipped and rolled; Thurman Kidd lost a splendid milk cow which fell into a deep gully, breaking her neck.

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Furlong-Bishop.  Mr. Chester Bishop, son of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Bishop of the South Fork section, and Miss Anna Mae Furlong, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Furlong, of the same section, were married in Scottsville last week.

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Hog-Processing Tax.  The Government processing tax on hogs applies to all parties who dress hogs, regardless of whether the man who dresses the hogs and sells them is a farmer, a packer, or retail meat dealer, but it does not apply to hogs killed and dressed for one’s own consumption.

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NOVEMBER 30, 1933

Legion Will Form “Minute Men” Unit.  In cooperation with the State Department of the American Legion, Barren County’s Post #28 has formulated plans for the organization of a local unit of the “Minute Men,” who will cooperate with the peace officers in apprehending bank robbers, etc. under a state wide system of communication.  The local organization will be composed of qualified citizens and is expected to have a membership of 100.  They will be sworn in as peace officers to function only upon call in the event an alarm is sounded for the purpose of capturing bandits.  They will be assigned to posts covering highways, with orders to “capture or kill” according to the plan which has been approved by Governor Laffoon.  The men will be equipped with pistols, rifles, and shotguns.

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From Summer Shade.  R.T. Norman was painfully injured Wednesday while at work at the State Rock Quarry, when he was caught between the elevator and the crusher.  He was taken to a doctor for treatment but was able to return to his home.

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Double Wedding.  On Saturday night, November 11, at 8:00 o’clock, a double wedding was solemnized at the home of Mr. Brent O. Anderson Sr. of Edmonton.  Miss Mabel Anderson was married to Mr. Hugh Tatum, and Miss Lois Marcum was married to Mr. Brent O. Anderson Jr.  The brides wore suits of blue wool crepe, with hats, gloves, purses, and slippers of the same color, and each bride wore pink roses on the lapels of their suits.  The couples were married by Bro. Barton, and the wedding march was played by Earl Fraser.  Mr. and Mrs. Tatum will be at home to their friends at Sulphur Well, and Mr. and Mrs. Anderson are making their home at Edmonton.

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From Arnett Grove.  Friends and neighbors gathered at the home of Mrs. Martha Deweese on Monday and house-cleaned and papered, and the men got up some wood for her.  Mrs. Deweese, about 85 years old, lives alone.

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Doyle Transfer Gets First 1934 Chevrolet Truck.  J.H. Webb, manager of the Ideal Chevrolet Company, will today deliver to the Doyle Transfer Company of  Glasgow, the first 1934 truck delivered in either Kentucky or Tennessee.  Mr. Webb went to Louisville yesterday for the new truck, which is only the fourth one built of the new model. It is a 1-1/2 ton truck, and Joe Lewis Bethel will pilot it to Nashville on its maiden voyage Friday.

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9500 Pounds of Salt Meat Distributed to Needy.  As of noon yesterday, the local relief office had delivered 9500 pounds of salt meat, furnished by the Government, to the needy of this county.  This distribution included 378 families, allowance being made for five pounds per person.

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Bon Ayr Home Burns.  The attractive country home of  W.E. Gray, just west of Bon Ayr, was burned to the ground Monday night from a defective flue.  Most of the furniture was removed, and the loss is believed to be covered by insurance.  Also, a barn belonging to W.H. Gray was burned, along with 700 sticks of tobacco and various implements.

 

 

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