September 1941 PDF Print
Thursday, 29 September 2011 14:31

SEPTEMBER 4, 1941

Work has started on construction of a “Dutch Mill” front to the building at intersection of Hiseville-Cave City Road and Jackson Highway which is being transformed into a tourist spot by Carroll Reams.
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Mr. and Mrs. Curd Bertram, city, have been informed that they became great- grandparents twice in one day, as there was only a five-minute difference in the birth of the two babies who were born in Bloomington, Indiana on Tuesday, August 19.  Mr. and Mrs. Allen Thomas are the parents of a boy, born on that date at 6:20 a.m., who has been named David Lee, for his two grandfathers.  Mr. and Mrs. Harry Brady are parents of a daughter, born at 6:15 a.m., same date, whose name is Muriel Annett.  Mrs. Brady was formerly Rebecca Thomas
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In an accident between a car and a school bus en route from Temple Hill, Wendell, 17, son of Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Harlow, suffered painful injuries.  One ear was almost severed.  The accident occurred when the driver of the car attempted to go around the bus, ran into loose gravel and lost control of the car, which turned over.
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Mr. and Mrs. Willie Myers and son Edward Botts, of Bruce, have returned from a visit to relatives and friends in Springfield and Taylorsville, Illinois and St. Louis, Missouri.
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Headed by the 25-piece First Kentucky Active Militia Band, a group of local business men attended the formal program for groundbreaking of the gigantic Wolf Creek Dam project which, when completed in about four or five years, will have cost some $55,000,000.  Prominent among the officials of the Upper Cumberland Valley Association were Dr. Clifton Richards, director from Barren County; Fred Pace, Marrowbone, director from Cumberland County; and Cass Walden, Edmonton, director from Metcalfe County.
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A young people’s service will be held at the First Christian Church next Sunday morning in observance of “Go-to-College” Sunday.  Special recognition will be given to the young people of the congregation who are leaving in the next few days for college or university.  Among those honored are:  Billie Mae Morris, Mary Kinnaird, Petie Leech, Charles Curtis Jones, Joe Leech, Ballard Trigg, Clayton Gooden, Sarah Beatty, Carolyn Howard, Lois Howard, and Carolyn Nunn.
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A thousand gallons of road oil went to waste, and necessitated some very careful driving last week, when a road-oiler tank burst at the foot of the hill below the Gilbert Jones’ place.  Several loads of screening had to be poured over the slimy road before traffic could resume its customary 64-mile gait.

SEPTEMBER 11, 1941

Big REA Exhibition at Merry Oaks.  Hundreds viewed the great Rural Electrification and Educational Display which opened today and will close Friday night.  The show is FREE to all farm people.  Every kind of electric gadget for use in rural homes is on display.  The show covers a large plot of ground in Merry Oaks and features several electrically equipped trailer trucks showing all the household devices and how they are operated.  The Homemakers are serving meals, sandwiches and drinks.  The public is cordially invited.
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Gooden, Neilly and Parrish, local real estate dealers, announce the sale of the Rufus Barbour farm of 126 acres at Goodnight to Dr. W. A. Weldon.  This farm adjoins the well-known Dr. Weldon farm, and the two farms combined will make one of the finest farms in Southern Kentucky.
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AD.  The Entire Staff of Lerman’s Invites All Their Friends To The Grand Opening of The Greatly Enlarged and Newly Modernized Store!  Come in Today!  We Are Ready to Serve You!
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Mark Dougherty accompanied five small boys to Louisville Tuesday for sights at the State Fair.  They were Billy and Joe Dougherty, Sammy Sears, Paul Biggers Jr and Roy Ganter.
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Jimmie Carver and children will give one of their concerts at Raymond School Friday night, September 12 at 7:30.  Admission, 10 cents and 15 cents.  If you are interested in nice clean entertainment, come out and spend the evening.  Plenty of fun and amusement.  Your money back if not satisfied.  James Carver and His Kid Band.
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SEPTEMBER 18, 1941

The employees of the Kentucky Pants Company, Inc. will get an increase in pay beginning September 29.  Management has been informed that the minimum wage rate will be set at 40 cents per hour on that day.
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South Fork Bridge to be Remodeled.  Another important, but inconspicuous detail of Federal Highway 90 was effected yesterday when bids were advertised for widening of the bridge over South Fork Creek at the Kentucky Utilities plant.  The bridge will be widened to conform to the present street and sidewalk plan as started by the City.  With completion of this important detail, the Burkesville Road from Glasgow to the intersection of the Leslie Road will be without a “bottleneck” or other similar narrow bridge structure.
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A wire from Mercer, California this morning announces the arrival of a son at the home of Mr. and Mrs. James Ritter.  This is great news to the grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. J. D. “Brud” Ritter of Temple Hill and to “Uncle” Superintendent Maxwell Ritter.
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Metcalfe County Marriage Licenses:  Shelby Carter, 21, and Magdalin Walbert, 16, of Edmonton; Lyron Estes, 19, and Camilla Moran, 17, Summer Shade.
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Three Harlow Brothers Are in Service.  Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Harlow of Route 4 have three sons serving Uncle Sam.  William Garland, age 22,  leaves tomorrow for an embarkation point near San Francisco, where he is slated to ship out for foreign service, presumably either the Canal Zone, the Philippines, or Hawaii.
George Vincent, age 24, is presently at Fort Eustis, Virginia; and Roy Wilson, age 26, is at Camp Hulen, Texas.  The Harlow boys have four sisters and one brother at home.
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SEPTEMBER 25, 1941

Trabue Breaks Arm.  It might be called a “family affair,” but is one that will prove very embarrassing to the Glasgow Scotties, when Joe and Bruce Trabue, two of the Scotties’ top-notchers, collided on the field during practice.  The unfortunate incident occurred when Bruce tackled Joe and, in some manner, fell on Joe’s hand, breaking both bones above the wrist.  The injured member is now in a cast and, as a result, the Scotties will be without their crack halfback for an indeterminable period.
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A very definite picture of “dam” prospects for Barren River, commonly referred to as Jews Harp Dam, was unfolded at a recent meeting of enthusiasts from Allen, Barren, and Simpson counties in Kentucky and Sumner and Macon counties in Tennessee.  The current site under consideration is located about nine miles south of the former Jews Harp Bend site, which had to be abandoned when it was discovered by Army Engineers that the limestone bluffs were full of caves and other crevices which would not permit a dam at that point to hold back water.
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The celebration at Old Mulkey Meeting House on Sunday, September 28, will have features of special interest.  A marker honoring Squire Boone will be
unveiled, and the Howard family will unveil a marker to Aunt Rachel, a faithful slave and maid of their ancestress Jane Hart Howard.  This monument will be erected at the foot of the mistress, whose husband, upon setting the slave free, gave Aunt Rachel and  her family a strip of land known as “Free Town.”  Aunt Rachel lived to the ripe age of 102.  Mrs. Mary Capps, of Pea Ridge, will sing in her own inimitable manner, and transcriptions of her folklore songs will be made with Professor Sulzer of the University of Kentucky in charge.
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John D. Mathews has returned to the home of his parents on Tompkinsville Road after being discharged from Fort Monmouth, New Jersey, where he had been assigned as a cook for Company G, 3rd Signal Battalion.  Matthews is sporting a $49 watch which was given to him by Gypsy Rose Lee, celebrated “strip tease” dancer, upon his designation as the best cook in Fort Monmouth.
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Sinking Springs School.  On Saturday, September 19, Miss Lula Basham, teacher, took her students on a picnic and sight-seeing tour to Nashville, leaving home at 8:30 a.m. and returning about 2:00 a.m. the next day.  They enjoyed a trip to the Parthenon, Centennial Park, the Tennessee State capitol and the War Memorial Building (which houses the State Museum), and finished out the day by attending the Grand Ole Opry.  They saw Roy Acuff and His Smoky Mountain Boys, Uncle Dave Macon, Minnie Pearl and other well known Opry stars.  Students reported it was one of the most enjoyable days ever spent as well as the most educational.
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